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Lean Cuisine Mutes the ‘Diet’ Conversation to ‘Weigh What Matters’

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At the start of the New Year – a time when resolutions by and large are centered around diet and weight loss – 360i client, Nestlé Lean Cuisine is bringing its #WeighThis movement full circle with an initiative that – quite literally – mutes the ‘diet‘ conversation.

Introducing the #WeighThis Diet Filter for Google Chrome™ – a browser extension that blocks out the word ‘diet’ from blogs, articles and social posts viewed by the user in a Chrome browser window. The extension is available for download in the Chrome store.

Lean Cuisine Weigh This
The brand also developed a handful of 3D-printed experimental TV filter devices that are being tested by influencers including Cassey Ho of blogilates, Lynn Chen of The Actor’s Diet and Hilary Rowland of Urbanette. The devices connect directly to a TV and by reading the closed captioning, automatically mute the audio when the word ‘diet’ is mentioned.

Both diet filters keep tally of how many times the ‘D word’ is blocked. And the best part? Lean Cuisine is turning the diet conversation into a force for good, culminating the effort with a $25,000 donation to Girls Leadership – a non-profit organization that empowers girls to create change in their world by “teaching them skills to know who they are, what they believe and how to express it.”

The Diet Filter comes as Act III to a major rebrand Lean Cuisine embarked on last June. In an effort to evolve perception from its outdated ‘diet’ roots heritage to a modern health and lifestyle brand, Lean Cuisine set out to encourage women to ‘weigh what matters’ in its #WeighThis social campaign. Upon receiving thousands of insightful, honest and moving responses from women about how they choose to be weighed, Lean Cuisine was inspired to memorialize the responses into something more lasting: an art installation display in Grand Central Station last fall.

Read more about the campaign in The Wall Street Journal.